A formulation of pancreatic pro-enzymes provides potent anti-tumour efficacy: a pilot study focused on pancreatic and ovarian cancer

Abstract

Proteolytic enzymes have shown efficacy in cancer therapy. We present a combination of the two pro-enzymes Trypsinogen and Chymotrypsinogen A with potent in vitro and in vivo anti-tumour efficacy. A synergetic anti-tumour effect for Trypsinogen and Chymotrypsinogen A was determined at a ratio 1:6 (named PRP) using 24 human cancer cell lines. The antiangiogenic effect of PRP was analysed by matrigel-based tube formation and by fibrous capsule formation assays. Furthermore, cell invasion and wound healing assays together with qRT-PCR determination of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers were performed on human cancer cells treated with PRP. Additionally, in vivo pharmacokinetic studies were implemented and the PRP’s anti-tumour efficacy was explored against orthotopic pancreatic and ovarian cancer tumours. PRP formulation was proven to inhibit in vitro angiogenesis, tumour growth, cancer cell migration and invasiveness; and to be an effective and well tolerated in vivo anti-tumour treatment. Finally, the clinical efficacy of a suppository formulation containing both pancreatic pro-enzymes in the context of a UK Pharmaceuticals Special Scheme was evaluated in advanced cancer patients. Consequently, PRP could have relevant oncological clinical applications for the treatment of advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma and advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

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Activated Cancer Therapy Using Light and Ultrasound – A Case Series of Sonodynamic Photodynamic Therapy in 115 Patients Over a 4 Year Period

Abstract:

Activated Cancer Therapy ( ACT), al so know n a s Sonodynamic Photodynamic Therapy ( SPDT) is a novel therapeutic modality that utilises a non-toxic photosensitive agent with reported ultrasound-activated properties. SPDT has
previously demonstrated significant tumour cell inhibition in animal studies. There has been much research into the efficacy of photodynamic therapy and development in understanding of the underlying mechanism of tumour cytotoxicity.
Synergistic ultrasound activation represents a promising development to activated sensitiser therapy, as photo-activation is
limited by access and penetrance issues. Ultrasound has been demonstrated to activate a number of sono-sensitive agents allowing the possibility of non-invasive targeted treatment of deeper tumour sites than is currently achievable with photodynamic therapy. This case series of 115 patients with a variety of cancer diagnoses reports on experiences of this treatment over a 4 year period using sublingual administration of a new dual activation agent, Sonnelux-1, followed by a protocol of LED light and low-intensity ultrasound exposure. Initial clinical observation suggests SPDT is worthy of further investigation a s an effective and well tolerated treatment for a wide variety of primary and metastatic tumours, including those refractory to chemotherapy

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Outcome Measures Following Sonodynamic Photodynamic Therapy – A Case Series

Abstract:

Sonodynamic Photodynamic Therapy (SPDT) is a novel cancer treatment approach using a photosensitive agent (Sonnelux-1) with reported ultrasound-activated properties. The sensitiser is administered prior to a cycle of light and low-intensity ultrasound exposure. Ultrasound has the advantage of significantly greater tissue penetrance compared to light, which potentially allows non-invasive activation of the sensitiser within deep-sited tumours. Sonnelux-1 has previously demonstrated significant tumour cell inhibition following ultrasound administration in animal studies, and several case reviews have been published reporting clinical benefits in metastatic cancer patients. This current case series presents outcome measures of five patients with a variety of cancer diagnoses following SPDT, providing further evidence of beneficial treatment outcomes.

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Influence of Yeast- Derived 1,3/1,6 Glucopolysaccharide on Circulating Cytokines and Chemokines with Respect to Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

Abstract:

Objective:  Wellmune is a food supplement containing a refined 1,3/1,6 glucopolysaccharide that improves the antimicrobial activity of the innate immune cells by the priming of lectin sites. This study aimed to investigate whether Wellmune decreases the frequency and severity of upperrespiratory tract infection (URTI) symptoms over 90 d during the peak URTI season in healthy university students. The secondary aims included an assessment of plasma cytokine and chemokine levels.

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Prevention of venous thrombosis in long-haul flights with Flite Tabs: the LONFLIT-FLITE randomized, controlled trial

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the development of edema, and superficial and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis with an oral profibrinolytic agent (Flite Tabs, 150 mg pinokinase, Aidan, Tempe, AZ, USA) in long-haul flights (7-8 hours), in high-risk subjects. A group of 300 subjects was included; 76 were excluded for several problems including concomitant treatments; 204 were randomized into 2 groups (active treatment or placebo) to evaluate the effects of prophylaxis with Flite Tabs. An exercise program was used in both groups. The femoral, popliteal, tibial, and superficial veins were scanned with ultrasound before and within 90 minutes after flights. Of the included subjects, 92 of 103 controls and 94 of 101 treated subjects completed the study. Dropouts were due to connection problems. Age, gender, and risk distribution were comparable in the groups. In the treatment group, no DVT was observed. In the control group, 5 subjects (5.4%) had a DVT and there were 2 superficial thromboses (7 events in 92 subjects; 7.6%). At inclusion, edema was comparable in the 2 groups. After flights there was an increase in score in controls (+12%) in comparison with a decrease (-15%) in the Flite Tabs group (the difference in variation was statistically significant). Intention-to-treat analysis for thrombotic events shows 18 failures in controls (11 lost to follow-up + 7 thrombotic events) of 92 subjects (19.6%) in comparison with 7 failures (of 94 subjects, equivalent to 7.4%) in the treatment group (p < 0.05). Events were asymptomatic. In conclusion, Flite Tabs were effective in reducing thrombotic events and in controlling edema in high-risk subjects in long flights.

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